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Medical Journal

Broccoli may reduce arthritis Jun 17 2016 10:34AM

British researchers believed that eating a lot of broccoli plant may slow or prevent the incidence of infection Mufasl.osabdo a research team at the University of East Anglia conducting experiments on humans after the success of studies conducted in laboratories.
Tests on some cells and mice and showed that the compound broccoli, which man can also get it from a plant cabbage, hampered by a major enzymes that damage cartilage in the body.
Researchers will be asked 20 people eating a daily dose of a specific type of "very center" of broccoli.
overdose
The introduction of this special type of plant to be rich broccoli more food vehicles, which is a cross between a traditional broccoli and a wild found in Sicily.
And our bodies absorb Gluckoravanin compound found in broccoli and then diverted to another compound called Solforavan, which works to protect the joints.
Volunteers will continue for two weeks on this diet before being subjected to repairs of the knee joints affected strongly by their surgeons.
The doctor will Rose Medical Davidson and her team examined the tissue removed to see the extent of the impact that eating broccoli.
Davidson said: "We ask patients to eat 100 grams each day for two weeks, and this unusual and a good dose in terms of quantity."
However it is very likely to be a period of two weeks is not enough to bring about any major change, Davidson hopes to provide evidence that the dose of broccoli "big" may be useful to humans.
Davidson said: "I can not imagine that this method will fix or prevent arthritis, but it can be a way to protect them."
The medical team will look at the evidence that the substance Solforavan already transmitted it to the desired location in the joints and it will occur useful therapeutic changes.
And it will be used for another group of 20 people who need a knee replacement that did not follow the diet, so as to be a group for comparison.
Said Alan Salman, a professor at the Institute of arthritis in the United Kingdom Research, an institute that funded the work of Dr. Davidson: "Research has so far failed to demonstrate that the food or diet can play a role in reducing the progress of arthritis, so if possible, repeat these results in humans, it will be a great success. "
He added: "betray know that exercise and maintaining a healthy weight can improve the symptoms of the disease in people, and reduces the chances of progression of the disease they have."
The results were published in animals and Davidson reached by the medical team in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism Arthritis & Rheumatism.
The development of this special type of broccoli, which dubbed Banefort name, through research funded by the public sector at the Institute of Food Research in the UK and John Innes Centre.
An estimated 8.5 million people in the UK from arthritis, a disease that particularly affects the hands, feet, spine, and knees.